GRID Alternatives Tactic Materials: Winter Gala

GRID Alternatives Tactical Materials

Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Event planning Document
  2. Event briefings
    1. Phillip Watkins
    2. Current workforce development trainee
    3. Mayor Hancock
    4. Al Gold 
  3. Potential keynote speakers                                     
  4. Budget
  5. Confirmation email 
  6. Thank you email 
  7. Key outcomes 
  8. Appendices
    1. Invitation 
    2. Menu
    3. Sources

EVENT PLANNING DOCUMENT: SOLAR MAKES JOBS FALL GALA 2017

Solar Makes Jobs: Fall Gala 2017

Basic Event Info:

Event Title: Solar Makes Jobs: Fall Gala
Event Date: 9/26/2017
Event Location: City Park Pavilion
Attendees: Expected attendance: 150
AR Event Lead: Clara Meek
Program Lead: Phillip Watkins

Outreach Info:

Initiative focus: Support for GRID’s workforce development program
Attendee focus: Donors and potential donors for GRID
Region focus: Major front range cities

Vendor Info:

Vendor: Contact: Providing: Drop Date/ Time
City Park Pavilion Event Coordinator

park.permits@denvergov.org   

(720) 913-0700

Venue for the event

Provides: staging kitchen and on-site facilitator, tables and chairs

9/26- 8 a.m.  Status: confirmed
Footers Catering Footers Main Line

303-762-1410

Providing a set three course menu of food for the event, cutlery and plating, set-up

  • Veggie: 5%
  • Gluten Free-5
  • Vegan: 5
  • Water
  • Tea and coffee
  • Waiters and staff
9/26-4 p.m.: Catering arrives

4:30 p.m.: Preparation and set-up

7:15 p.m.: First course served

7:50 p.m.: Clean-up three courses

Status: confirmed

Peak Beverages Rori McBride

Rori@peakbev.com

O: (720) 722-1140

C: (505) 350-6411

Alcohol, bartenders, non-alcoholic beverages, set-up 9/26: Drop 3:30 p.m.

Bar set: 5:30 p.m.

Bar opens: 6:15 p.m.

Bar closes: 9:15 p.m.

Status: Confirmed

Decor Colorado Event Productions

info@coloradoeventproductions.com

O: (970) 613-1886

Lighting and linnens 9/26: 10 a.m.: Arrival and set-up

Status: confirmed

DJ Connection DJ Chris

O: (303) 532-4074

Entertainment during auction, DJ/MC service,

Speakers and Microphones

9/26: 5:00 p.m.: Arrive and set-up

Status: Confirmed

Keynote speaker Mayor Hancock

(720) 865-9000

Keynote speaker 9/26: 7:30 p.m.: arrival

8:10 p.m.: Speech

Status: Confirmed

Photographer Big Sun Photography

gene@bigsunphotography.com

(970) 306-7721

Photography 9/26: 6:00 p.m.: Arrival

Status: Confirmed

Invitations FedEx Kinkos

(303) 486-4481

Print 160 invitations Send out invitations three months before event
Bonnie Brae Jim Gobert

Bonnie Brae Flowers

C: (303) 744-1091

jgobert@msn.com

Florals and Decor

18 Autumn flower arrangements, 9 Autumn bouquets

9/26: 4:30 p.m. arrival and set-up

Status: confirmed

Entertainment info:

Entertainer: Contact: Timing: Staff Contact:
DJ Chris (303) 532-4074 5:30 p.m. arrival Clara Meek

Giveaway:

Giveaway Description # Needed Vendor Contact Delivered by
Items for Wheel of Grid At GRIDs discretion At GRIDs discretion
Items for silent auction At GRIDs discretion At GRIDs discretion

NOTE: *Potential auction items from large donors (i.e. the city of Pasadena donor gives away a California trip for auction), board of director donations (i.e. Ben Tarble on GRID’s board of directors works at Google and could offer the chance to come see Google’s headquarters) and local shops (i.e. Gracie’s boutique on Pearl st. in Denver is very active in gala auctioning at other events)

Staffing Structure:

Staffer: Role: Responsibility: Contact: Due on site:
Clara Meek Event Lead Manage overall event, answer any questions, make sure the look and feel are exactly as planned and everyone is where they need to be at all times. Float during event (847) 217-0917

clara6195@yahoo.com

9/26: 8 a.m.
Jake Bobrow Development Lead Oversee all speakers, ensure that the message of the night is coming across to attendees and that attendees are involved and donating JBobrow@gridalternatives.org 9/26: 8 a.m.
GRID employees and Octopi Relations employees Volunteers Will be assigned jobs for during the event to make sure event runs smoothly   9/26: 3 p.m.

Speaker Program:

Title Date/Time Action Location
CEO of GRID CO Speaks: Phillip Watkins 9/26: 7:50 p.m. See briefing City Park Pavilion
Workforce development participant speaks (TBD) 9/26: 8:00 p.m. See briefing City Park Pavilion
Keynote speaker: Mayor Hancock 9/26: 8:10 p.m. See briefing City Park Pavilion
Cultivated donor speaks 9/26: 8:25 p.m. See briefing City Park Pavilion

Overall Tick Tock:

Date: Time: Action: Location:
9/26 8 a.m. Pavilion becomes ours City Park Pavilion
9/26 8 a.m. Ensure that everything is ready to be delivered, set-up tables and chairs,  run through scheduling with the on-site facilitator City Park Pavilion
9/26 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Colorado Event Productions arrives, begins setting up lighting, more specifically the donation light wall, set up tables with linens City Park Pavilion
9/26 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Ensure linens and tables look as they should City Park Pavilion
9/26 2 p.m.- 4 p.m. Auction items delivered from prospective donor (i.e.-Gracie’s boutique will drop off their items) within this designated time slot City Park Pavilion
9/26 3 p.m.- 10 p.m. Volunteers from GRID and Octopi arrive for designation of roles and responsibilities, help with the rest of set-up before the event City Park Pavilion
9/26 3:30 p.m. Peak Beverages arrives, begins bar set-up City Park Pavilion
9/26 4:00 p.m. Catering arrives, starts setup and meal preparation in the kitchen City Park Pavilion
9/26 4:30 p.m. Florist arrives, they are directed to where flowers need to be in correlation with the lighting and table decor City Park Pavilion
9/26 3:30 p.m. Volunteers help put signage up for vendors and attendees City Park Pavilion
9/26 4:00 p.m. Volunteers help display auction items on table, including sheets of paper and pens with signs from each auction item City Park Pavilion
9/26 5:00 p.m. Volunteers help set-up “Wheel of GRID” designed by GRID Alternatives City Park Pavilion
9/26 5:00 p.m. DJ Chris arrives, begins setting up booth and audio equipment City Park Pavilion
9/26 5:30 p.m. Clara does run through with DJ over MC needs and playlists, provides him with schedule City Park Pavilion
9/26 5:45 p.m. Clara checks to see the look of the “Wheel of GRID” and the tabling of donation items City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:00 p.m. Photographer arrives, he is told where to take pictures dependant on the lighting, works with lighting person to figure this out City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:15 p.m. All is set for the event, volunteers are asked to wait by doors in order to direct people and help those who may need help getting out of the car City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:00 p.m. Wall of lights turns on City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:15-7:00 p.m. Aside from volunteers outside the doors, remaining volunteers will be helping check guests in, provide table placement, as well as coat check City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:30 p.m. Event begins City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:30 p.m. Guests begin to arrive as well as the speakers for the speaker series at the event City Park Pavilion
9/26 6:30 p.m.-7:15 p.m. Guests mingle, sign for auction items, get drinks from Peak via the bar and the bartender service and can play GRID of fortune City Park Pavilion
9/26 7:00 p.m. DJ Chris asks for all to finish what they are doing, grab a drink and take a seat at their designated tables for dinner, silent auction concludes City Park Pavilion
9/26 7:00 p.m. DJ Chris plays light background music, servers begin serving the first course City Park Pavilion
9/26 7:15 p.m. Servers begin clearing first course and serving the second course City Park Pavilion
9/26 7:30 p.m. Mayor Hancock arrives, stays in the lobby until he is asked to give his keynote, an extra plate of food will be made for him if need be City Park Pavilion
9/26 7:40 p.m. Second course starts being cleared City Park Pavilion
9/26 7:50 p.m. CEO, Philip Watkins begins his introduction to the event, he will be sitting at a table City Park Pavilion
9/26 8:00 p.m. Mr. Watkins sits back down, the workforce development participant stands up and begins his/her talk City Park Pavilion
9/26 8:10 p.m. Workforce development participant sits back down, Mayor Hancock walks in through the front entrance of the event City Park Pavilion
9/26 8:35 p.m. Mayor Hancock concludes his keynote, waves goodbye and is able to leave the event City Park Pavilion
9/26 8:35 p.m. Cultivated donor, Al Gold, stands up and provides his final statement as well as thanks Mayor Hancock City Park Pavilion
9/26 8:45 p.m. Guests are served their third course, dessert City Park Pavilion
9/26 8:50 p.m. DJ Chris begins announcing the winners of the silent auction City Park Pavilion
9/26 9:10 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Event concludes, CEO gives one final thank you and goodbye, guests are allowed to start leaving, meandering, those that won auction items and can pick them up, pick them up City Park Pavilion
9/26 9:05 p.m. Volunteers are asked to stand by the doors again and say thank you and goodbye City Park Pavilion
9/26 9:30 p.m.-11:00 p.m. Clean-up and take down begins

  • Linens and flower arrangements are put into Clara’s Car
  • Tables and chairs are taken down and put in perspective places
  • Caterer cleans up remaining plateware and dishes
  • Peak takes down bar
  • DJ Chris takes down his equipment
  • Volunteers help take down, wall of lights (carefully), collect auction items that will be delivered to winners later on and take down the GRID of Fortune, as well as help with any extra clean-up
City Park Pavilion
9/26 11:00 p.m. The gala officially concludes-yay! City Park Pavilion

Marketing and Communications needs:

Action Due Date Staff Contact
Accept/Finalize Communications Plan End 2016 For GRID use
Event Registration Page March 2017 For GRID use
Email Invite April 2017 For GRID use
Social Online Media Campaign March-September 2017 For GRID use
Reminder Email September 1 2017 For GRID use
Confirmation/ Follow-up Email For Auction Winners September 18 2017 For GRID use
Thank You Email For All Donors And Attendees September 22 2017 For GRID use

Outstanding Action Items: (For GRID use as extraneous items and situations arise during planning and implementation stages.

Item Staff Responsible Notes Due Date
Complete Complete

BRIEFING FOR PHILIP WATKINS, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR GRID COLORADO

Dec. 6, 2016

GRID Alternatives Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala

Date: Saturday, Sept. 17, 2017

Time: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Location: City Park Pavilion

1700 N. York St.

Denver, CO 80202

From: Lindsay Miner, Octopi Relations

 

  • PURPOSE:

 

YOU are a featured speaker at GRID Alternatives’ Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala. Current and potential donors and sponsors have been invited to this gala and silent auction to become engaged with the workforce development program. The focus of the event is to raise awareness and recognition of the workforce development program and, most importantly, to get donations that will contribute to the funding of the program. Through this event, GRID Alternatives is seeking to raise $20,000-$25,000 in funding.

 

  • SEQUENCE OF EVENTS

 

  • At 6:30 p.m., YOU arrive at City Park Pavilion and are greeted by Clara Meek, Events & Protocol Manager. Clara will provide a quick briefing and escort you into the event room to mingle with guests and enjoy silent auction items.
  • At 7:00 p.m. YOU will be seated at your assigned table in the dining area with current and potential donors and two workforce development program trainees for dinner.
  • At 7:50 p.m., YOU give brief remarks about your experience in solar energy and at GRID Alternatives Colorado.
  • At 8:00 p.m., YOU introduce TBD Workforce Development Trainee.
  • Following your remarks, YOU return to your dinner table.
  • At 9:30 p.m., YOU depart.

 

  • PARTICIPANTS
  • YOU

 

  1. TBD Workforce Development Trainee
  2. Mayor Michael Hancock
  3. Al Gold, Cultivated Donor for GRID Alternatives
  4. 150 attendees

Registrants: 150

  • 50 in large corporations potential donors
  • 50 in small corporations/foundations potential donors
  • 50 past and current donors

 

  • STAFF ATTENDEES

 

Event Staff Attending:

  • Clara Meek, Manager of Events & Protocol
  • Jake Bobrow, GRID Colorado Development Manager

Additional GRID Alternatives Staff Attending:

  • Allison Moe, Workforce Development Manager
  • GRID Colorado Board of Directors
  • GRID Colorado volunteers

 

  • BACKGROUND

 

GRID Alternatives intends to raise $1 million in funding for the workforce development program in Colorado by 2019. GRID Alternatives Colorado is seeking sponsors and donors in companies, corporations, and foundations that are passionate both about employment skills training and solar energy. The following groups present the highest potential for sponsorship and/or donations for GRID Alternatives Colorado’s workforce development program:

Corporations Foundations
Centura Health The Anschutz Foundation
Centurylink El Pomar Foundation
Wells Fargo Boettcher Foundation
Kaiser Permanente The Colorado Health Foundation
Walmart The Daniels Fund
Chevron Gates Family Foundation

 

  • SUGGESTED REMARKS

 

  • Share your solar energy story– what attracted you to the industry, what kept you in solar energy and what have you gained?
  • Share your journey to GRID Alternatives– how did GRID shape your goals and your drive to reach them? What has been the best part of your work and what are you most proud of?
  • Share your excitement about GRID’s future in the Workforce Development Program:
    • Growing 20% each year
    • Looking to raise $1 million in sponsors/donations to stipend individuals in the Workforce Development Program.
    • Direct influence on underrepresented and underserved members of the Denver metro community:
      • Women
      • Ex-offenders
      • Veterans
  • Encourage attendees to connect with GRID Alternatives in this opportune moment for growth and support.

EVENT BRIEFING FOR WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYEE, TBD

Dec. 6, 2016

GRID Alternatives Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala

Date: Saturday, Sept. 17, 2017

Time: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Location: City Park Pavilion

1700 N. York St.

Denver, CO 80202

From: Paige Evans, Octopi Relations

 

  • PURPOSE:

 

YOU are a featured speaker at GRID Alternatives’ Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala. Current and potential donors and sponsors have been invited to this gala and silent auction to become engaged with the workforce development program. The focus of the event is to raise awareness and recognition of the workforce development program and, most importantly, to get donations that will contribute to the funding of the program. Through this event, GRID Alternatives is seeking to raise $10,000-$15,000 in funding.

  1. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS:
  • YOU will arrive at City Park Pavilion at 6:30 p.m. and will be greeted by Clara Meek, GRID Alternatives Events Director. Clara will supply you with any necessary background or briefing, then will escort you to the events room to mingle with guests and enjoy silent auction items.
  • At 7:00 p.m. YOU will be seated at your assigned table in the dining area with current and potential donors and one other workforce development program trainee for dinner.
  • At 8:00 p.m. Philip Watkins, Executive Director, will introduce YOU and YOU will make your way on stage for your speech.
  • At 8:10 p.m. YOU will introduce Mayor Hancock for his speech then return to your assigned table.
  • At 9:30 p.m. the event will end and YOU will depart.

III.       PARTICIPANTS:

    1. Philip Watkins, Executive Director

 

  • YOU

 

  1. Mayor Michael Hancock
  2. Al Gold, Cultivated Donor for GRID Alternatives
  3. 150 invited guests

Registrants: 150

  • 50 in large corporations potential donors
  • 50 in small corporations/foundations potential donors
  • 50 past and current donors
  1.       STAFF ATTENDEES:

Event Staff Attending:

  • Clara Meek, Manager of Events & Protocol
  • Jake Bobrow, GRID Colorado Development Manager

Additional GRID Alternatives Staff Attending:

  • Allison Moe, Workforce Development Manager
  • GRID Colorado Board of Directors
  • GRID Colorado volunteers
  1.        BACKGROUND:

GRID Alternatives intends to raise $1 million in funding for the workforce development program in Colorado by 2019. GRID Alternatives Colorado is seeking sponsors and donors in companies, corporations, and foundations that are passionate both about employment skills training and solar energy. The following groups present the highest potential for sponsorship and/or donations for GRID Alternatives Colorado’s workforce development program:

Corporations Foundations
Centura Health The Anschutz Foundation
Centurylink El Pomar Foundation
Wells Fargo Boettcher Foundation
Kaiser Permanente The Colorado Health Foundation
Walmart The Daniels Fund
Chevron Gates Family Foundation
  1.       SUGGESTED REMARKS:
  • Make your speech motivational and personal in nature; share with the audience how you became involved in the workforce development program
    • What was your life like before entering the workforce development program?
    • How did you find out and become a part of GRID Alternatives workforce development program?
  • Tell your workforce development program trainee story
    • What was the program actually like?
    • How did you feel at the beginning of the program? During the program? After you completed the training program?
  • Share the impact of the workforce development program on your life
    • What is your life like now? How is this an improvement from your life before?
    • How has this impacted your future and your family’s/loved ones’ futures?
    • Why is the workforce development program so important to you?
  • Close your speech by driving home how deeply needed the workforce development program was for you and for so many others around Colorado.

EVENT BRIEFING FOR MAYOR MICHAEL HANCOCK

Dec. 6, 2016    

                                                                                                                       

GRID Alternatives Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala

Date: Saturday, Sept. 17, 2017

Time: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Location: City Park Pavilion

1700 N. York St.

Denver, CO 80202

From: Kellsie Brannen, Octopi Relations

  1. PURPOSE

YOU are the keynote speaker at GRID Alternatives’ Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala. Current and potential donors and sponsors have been invited to this gala and silent auction to become engaged with the workforce development program. The focus of the event is to raise awareness and recognition of the workforce development program and, most importantly, to get donations that will contribute to the funding of the program. Through this event, GRID Alternatives is seeking to raise $10,000-$15,000 in funding.

  1. SEQUENCE OF EVENTS
  • YOU will arrive at City Park Pavilion at 7:30 p.m. and will be greeted by Clara Meek, GRID Alternatives Events Director. Clara will supply you with any necessary background or briefing.
  • Around 8:10, YOU will walk through the front entrance of the event after being introduced by the workforce development program trainee
  • YOU will give the keynote speech of the evening, lasting 20-30 minutes
  • Upon the conclusion of your speech, YOU will wave goodbye to the crowd and exit the event
  • Around 8:50 p.m., YOU depart

III. PARTICIPANTS

    1. Philip Watkins, Executive Director
    2. Workforce Development Program Trainee, TBD

 

  • YOU

 

  1. Al Gold, Cultivated Donor for GRID Alternatives
  2. 150 invited guests

Registrants: 150

  • 50 in large corporations potential donors
  • 50 in small corporations/foundations potential donors
  • 50 past and current donors
  1. STAFF ATTENDEES

Event Staff Attending:

  • Clara Meek, Manager of Events & Protocol
  • Jake Bobrow, GRID Colorado Development Manager

Additional GRID Alternatives Staff Attending:

  • Allison Moe, Workforce Development Manager
  • GRID Colorado Board of Directors
  • GRID Colorado volunteers
  1. BACKGROUND

GRID Alternatives intends to raise $1 million in funding for the workforce development program in Colorado by 2019. GRID Alternatives Colorado is seeking sponsors and donors in companies, corporations, and foundations that are passionate both about employment skills training and solar energy. The following groups present the highest potential for sponsorship and/or donations for GRID Alternatives Colorado’s workforce development program:

Corporations Foundations
Centura Health The Anschutz Foundation
Centurylink El Pomar Foundation
Wells Fargo Boettcher Foundation
Kaiser Permanente The Colorado Health Foundation
Walmart The Daniels Fund
Chevron Gates Family Foundation
  1. SUGGESTED REMARKS
  • Share your history of dedication to workforce development in Denver as Mayor.
    • What initiatives you have taken, who you work with and why you chose to become so invested in workforce development
  • Share why workforce development programs are so critical to the community and Colorado as a whole.
  • Share why you think that GRID’s workforce development program contributes to these goals.
  • Encourage people to help GRID provide stable employment and help Colorado’s workforce by donating to the program.

BRIEFING FOR AL GOLD, CULTIVATED DONOR

Dec. 6, 2016

GRID Alternatives Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala

Date: Saturday, Sept. 17, 2017

Time: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Location: City Park Pavilion

1700 N. York St.

Denver, CO 80202

From: Olivia Sheehan, Octopi Relations

 

  • PURPOSE

 

YOU are a featured speaker at GRID Alternatives’ Solar Makes Jobs Fall Gala. Current and potential donors and sponsors have been invited to this gala and silent auction to become engaged with the workforce development program. The focus of the event is to raise awareness and recognition of the workforce development program and, most importantly, to get donations that will contribute to the funding of the program. Through this event, GRID Alternatives is seeking to raise $10,000-$15,000 in funding.

 

  • SEQUENCE OF EVENTS

 

  • YOU will arrive at City Park Pavilion at 6:30 p.m. and will be greeted by Clara Meek, GRID Alternatives Events Director. Clara will supply you with any necessary background or briefing, then will escort you to the events room to mingle with guests and enjoy silent auction items.
  • At 7:00 p.m. YOU will be seated at your assigned table in the dining area with current and potential donors and two workforce development program trainees for dinner.
  • At 7:50 p.m., CEO Philip Watkins will speak and introduce the main goals of the Gala.
  • At 8:00 p.m., a workforce development trainee will speak to his/her experience in the program.
  • At 8:10 p.m., keynote speaker Mayor Hancock speaks.
  • At 8:35 p.m., YOU will discuss your impact of donations to GRID as well as give the closing remarks.
  • At 9:30 p.m. the event will end and YOU will depart

 

  • PARTICIPANTS

 

  1. Philip Watkins, Executive Director
  2. Workforce Development Program Trainee, TBD
  3. Mayor Michael Hancock
  4. YOU
  5. 150 invited guests

Registrants: 150

  • 50 in large corporations potential donors
  • 50 in small corporations/foundations potential donors
  • 50 past and current donors

 

  • STAFF ATTENDEES

 

Event Staff Attending:

  • Clara Meek, Manager of Events & Protocol
  • Jake Bobrow, GRID Colorado Development Manager

Additional GRID Alternatives Staff Attending:

  • Allison Moe, Workforce Development Manager
  • GRID Colorado Board of Directors
  • GRID Colorado volunteers

 

  • BACKGROUND

 

GRID Alternatives intends to raise $1 million in funding for the workforce development program in Colorado by 2019. GRID Alternatives Colorado is seeking sponsors and donors in companies, corporations, and foundations that are passionate both about employment skills training and solar energy. The following groups present the highest potential for sponsorship and/or donations for GRID Alternatives Colorado’s workforce development program:

Corporations Foundations
Centura Health The Anschutz Foundation
Centurylink El Pomar Foundation
Wells Fargo Boettcher Foundation
Kaiser Permanente The Colorado Health Foundation
Walmart The Daniels Fund
Chevron Gates Family Foundation

 

  • SUGGESTED REMARKS

 

  • Discuss the importance of donations to the workforce development program.
    • 11.1% of solar companies find it very difficult to find trained employees, 70.6% find it somewhat difficult
  • Discuss why you feel as though GRID is a great organization to donate to.
  • Discuss how you see your donations at work.
  • Talk about how the smallest donations can help.
  • Why do you support GRID?
  • What does the workforce development program mean to you?
  • End by thanking everyone for attending.

POTENTIAL KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

 

  • Mayor Hancock: Mayor of Denver

 

      • Who: Mayor Hancock is Denver’s 45th mayor and joined office in July of 2011
      • Why: He believes there is nothing more important than helping every young person in every neighborhood compete and succeed in the 21st Century economy.
        • Mayor Hancock has done a lot of work to expand workforce development for lower class individuals through initiatives and discussion
        • He is committed to creating economic opportunity and eliminating inequality in the workforce
      • Cost: Mayor Hancock is free to speak because he currently holds a political office position

 

  • Tracey Kraft-Tharps: State representative for house district 29 in Colorado

 

      • Who: Kraft-Tharps represents house district 29 in Colorado (Arvada and Westminster)
        • She is the vice chair to legislation committee: business, labor, economic, and workforce development

 

  • Why: As vice chair on a committee to improve workforce development in Colorado, she is compassionate about the professional growth and education of  underrepresented individuals

 

        • On her committee, she works to provide job training and coaching to unemployed and underemployed in Colorado
        • She wants there to be more programs like GRID’s workforce development program
      • Cost: Representative Kraft-Tharps is free to speak because he currently holds a political office position

 

  • Stefanie Veck: Director of Colorado Workforce Development Council

 

      • Who: As director, Veck works to provide a dynamic partnership between workforce development, economic development, education, business and government

 

  • Previously,  she worked to bring communities and businesses together to create and implement Colorado Companies to recognize and support growing companies creating jobs

 

      • Why: Her position entails working to create a better understanding of workforce development
        • She works to better the understanding and notion behind workforce development
        • She understands the importance workforce development has on the success of individuals throughout their lives

 

  • Cost: ~$1,000
  • Gwen Farnsworth: Senior Energy Policy Advisor for Western Resource Advocates

 

      • Who: Gwen develops, advocates and  focuses on accelerating the Colorado’s transition to renewable energy, energy efficiency, and other clean energy strategies.
      • Why: Gwen is a strong advocate for solar energy in Colorado. She has an extensive background in solar energy through legislation and hands-on experience. She is aware of the growing industry and is a strong proponent for the success of solar energy. She knows the impact and benefits that going solar has
      • Cost: ~$1,000

 

  • Denise Bryant: Denver director of workforce development in the Office of Economic Development

 

    • Who: Bryant has spent nearly two decades providing operational, financial management, and programmatic expertise to workforce development initiatives in the Chicago area.
      • She advocates to strengthen and shape policy that supports a sustainable and prepared workforce
    • Why: Bryant has an extensive background working with individuals to provide the knowledge they need to succeed in the workforce
      • She is aware of legislation and is strong proponent for fixing the legislation towards workforce development
    • Cost: ~$2,500 (Round-trip flight to Denver, hotel, car rental fee’s and cost to keynote)

GALA BUDGET

CONFIRMATION AND THANK YOU EMAIL

Confirmation Email:

Dear ~~~~~,

Congratulations, you’ve been registered to attend the 2016 GRID Gala! Here’s what you can expect:

  • 30 great silent auction items such as a trip to Google headquarters, a trip to the mountains and more!
  • Keynote speaker Michael Hancock, current mayor of Denver
  • Complimentary cocktails
  • Three course dinner
  • + more!

We look forward to seeing you on September 16th at the City Park Pavilion. Reception begins at 6:30 p.m. and dinner begins at 7:15 p.m. Come ready for a great night for a good cause!

Best,

GRID Alternatives

1120 W 12th Ave.

Denver, CO 80204

(866) 921-4696

Thank you email:

Dear ~~~~~,

On behalf of GRID Alternatives and all future participants in the workforce development program, we want to thank you for your support in attending the 2016 GRID Gala. Solar creates jobs and GRID does solar, and by helping GRID you’re helping to save the environment while also allowing local underprivileged workers get the steady employment they need to get back on their feet. We hope that you had a wonderful night and understand our work and vision better than ever.

Keep up to date with what you’re helping GRID accomplish by visiting our website at gridalternatives.org/colorado and following us on social media at @GRIDColorado.

We look forward to seeing you at future GRID events.

Best,

GRID Alternatives

1120 W 12th Ave.

Denver, CO 80204

(866) 921-4696

KEY OUTCOMES

 

  • Inform the local community about GRID Alternatives, specifically the Workforce Development Program, encouraging them to take action by contributing to the solar energy cause.
  • ™Double the amount of donations to the amount spent on the event

 

    • Spend $10,000 and make $20,000
  • ™Increase support for the workforce development program and GRID
  • ™Increase awareness for the workforce development program and GRID
  • ™Generate an understanding about the importance of workforce development for Colorado’s solar industry
    • 11.1% of solar companies find it very difficult to find trained employees, 70.6% find it somewhat difficult
  • Ensure guests satisfaction and fun with the event

APPENDICES

 

  • Gala Printed invitation:

 

(B) Gala Menu:  

  1. C) Sources

About the Office of the Mayor | Office of Mayor Michael B. Hancock. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2016, from

https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/mayors-office/about-the-office-of-the-mayor.html

Denver’s workforce efforts get boost with leadership announcement. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14,

2016, from https://www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/en/denver-office-of-economic-development/newsroom/2014/denver-s-workforce-efforts-get-boost-with-leadership-announcemen.html

Gwen Farnsworth – Western Resource Advocates. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2016, from http://westernresourceadvocates.org/staff/gwen-farnsworth/

Staff | Colorado Workforce Development Council. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2016, from https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cwdc/staff-0

Tracy Kraft-Tharp » About Tracy. (n.d.). Retrieved November 14, 2016, from http://tracyforstaterep.com/?page_id=12

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GRID Alternatives Campaign Plan

GRID Alternatives Campaign Plan

Workforce Development Program 2017-2019

Octopi Relations: Paige Evans, Kellsie Brannen, Clara Meek, Matthew Lambrecht, Lindsay Miner & Olivia Sheehan 

Table of Contents

  1. Executive Summary 
  2. Situation Analysis 
  3. Key Publics Overview
  4. Strategies and Tactics
  5. Campaign Calendar 
  6. Proposed Budget 
  7. Evaluation
  8. Appendices

TO: GRID Alternatives Colorado

FROM: Octopi Communications

DATE: October 11, 2016

RE: PR Campaign Proposal for GRID Alternatives Colorado

______________________________________________________________________________

  1. Executive Summary

GRID Alternatives is a Colorado-based solar nonprofit that installs solar panel on houses in low-income areas, lowering or eliminating the cost of energy for those households in a way that is sustainable and supports clean energy. They also have a somewhat-less developed and newer initiative in Colorado, their workforce development program, which allows them to provide training to populations often marginalized in the workforce and especially in the solar industry—ex-felons, women, people of color and so on—and provide them with life-long job skills that they can carry beyond GRID Alternatives into stable jobs. The company wants to raise one million dollars to go towards the latter initiative, which would allow the company to offer “scholarships” to people traditionally underrepresented in the solar industry and provide them with solar installation training for free, pay them to install solar panels and then allow them to obtain stable employment after their time with GRID with these new skills.

While GRID has garnered media coverage in the past, it nearly exclusively surrounds their “primary” project—installing solar panels in low income areas. Therefore, perceptions of the company are primarily focused on this rather than GRID’s workforce development work. We need to update the public’s understanding of the company’s programs and refresh their awareness of the company in general, particularly amongst our key publics. Therefore, our communications objectives center around raising one million dollars for the workforce development program by 2019, raising awareness of the program amongst possible donors and sponsors and increase brand awareness and outreach in general.

The key publics that GRID needs to reach are potential large donors, foundations, potential small donors and solar companies who are seeking (or could potentially seek) new, fully-trained employees. After considering research regarding these publics, we have determined  that using a combination of social media, events (both hosting and attending), outreach to local media, sponsorships, face to face communication and relationship building to best work in our favor.

Considering our key publics, communication goals and communication objectives, we arrived at the following strategies for recommendation: creating a presence at solar energy events, creating a more personal perception of the workforce development program by featuring stories on actual participants, creating a sponsorship program with companies in which they would fund a trainee that would go on to work for the company, creating an ongoing relationship with charitable organizations dedicated to employment issues, creating awareness among existing GRID donors of the Workforce Development Program and creating a Colorado-specific social media presence.

______________________________________________________________________________

  1. Situation Analysis

The mission of GRID Alternatives is, according to their website,  “a transition to clean, renewable energy that includes everyone,” as well as to “…make renewable energy technology and job training available to underserved communities.” The company believes that “free, clean electricity from the sun should be available to everyone,” and that solar energy is not only environmentally good, but a solution to real-world economic issues in low-income communities—job training and development in sustainable careers and lowering (or eliminating) heating costs. There are several trends that will likely affect GRID Alternatives in a positive manner, including an increased interest in alternative and sustainable energy sources, both politically and socially. The solar market has seen huge growth in the past few years, particularly in Colorado, where it grew by triple digits in the past year alone. However, this also means that GRID Alternatives will have more voices in solar to compete with for the attention of its audience. In terms of workforce development, a substantial amount (over 80%) of Colorado solar companies report that they have either a somewhat or very difficult time finding qualified employees in the solar installation sector, which is a huge opportunity for GRID to draw interest to its workforce development program.

The current perception of GRID Alternatives in the media mainly centers around the company’s efforts to bring solar energy to underprivileged areas. The idea of bringing renewable, clean energy to low-income areas (since solar energy is typically seen as expensive and only reasonably available to the wealthy) and how it helps these communities to lower or eliminate energy costs dominates coverage, and there has been little to no media coverage of the workforce development program. We want to expand the perception of GRID as a company that not only brings solar to low-income areas to create sustainable energy solutions, but also one that offers workforce training to typically marginalized and/or underrepresented publics in the solar industry—ex-felons, women, people of color and so on. Our desired perception of GRID is a company that serves low-income and marginalized populations with solar through free solar installation AND workforce training.

______________________________________________________________________________

SWOT Analysis

Strengths:

  • Solar energy involvement is understood, marketed and positively perceived
  • Solar energy industry is growing
  • Stand out in their industry as contributing to solar energy initiatives and job training and enhancement opportunities
  • Degree of information about solar panel installation in underserved communities is high
Weaknesses:

  • Degree of information about Workforce Development Program is low
  • Workforce Development Program is underrepresented in current media presence and/or is misunderstood as a key project of GRID Alternatives
  • Social media presence related to key publics and target audience
Opportunities:

  • Clarify and solidify understanding of and perceptions of GRID Alternatives as active in job training and employment enhancement projects
  • Reach potential donors for the Workforce Development Program through social media engagement, events involvement and appeals to key public interest
  • Take advantage of growth in solar energy industry by involving this growth more directly in job training and employment enhancement opportunities/projects
  • Initiate long-term relationships with current and potential donors and sponsors for the Workforce Development Program
Threats:

  • Misunderstanding of past communications/media perceptions
  • Other, more developed job training/work development/employment enhancement programs and projects
  • Saturation of the media by other solar companies in Colorado’s quickly growing solar industry

The core problem for GRID Alternatives as it prepares to launch its ambassador program and membership drive are its past communications and efforts at outreach with key publics most relevant in solar energy and job training programs. That being said, the most notable area of opportunity for GRID is in its capacity to engage with potential sponsors and donors via social media, events, involvement in programs and clarification of communication of desired perceptions, projects and goals. There are many levels of engagement plausible for GRID in reaching solar energy companies and/or organizations, job training and employment enhancement companies and/or organizations and companies and/or organizations looking to increase their community involvement and outreach. Thus, there is a valuable opportunity for GRID to redirect its past miscommunications/misunderstandings on the Workforce Development Program by engaging with various types of potential donors and sponsors through events and media so as to increase their attainment of funding, create long-term relationships with the key publics of the campaign and transform perceptions to progress brand awareness and brand image in terms of both solar energy and job training and employment enhancement.

Communication goals and objectives:

    • GOAL: Raise $1 Million in funding by 2019
      • OBJECTIVE:  Raise $200,00 by September 2017
      • OBJECTIVE: Raise additional $350,000 by September 2018
      • OBJECTIVE: Raise additional $450,000 by end of 2018
    • GOAL: Inform the community about GRID, specifically the workforce development program
      • OBJECTIVE: Host events as well as a sponsorship program that will help potential donors learn about GRID and the workforce development program.
    • GOAL: Increase outreach and brand awareness
      • OBJECTIVE: Increase awareness among key publics to GRID alternatives and the workforce development program through media outlets by 10

______________________________________________________________________________

  1. Key Publics Overview

The key publics that GRID needs to reach during this campaign are potential large donors, particularly the executives of corporations; foundations; small donors, particularly individual donors; and, lastly, solar companies who may want to “sponsor” the training of employees who will eventually go on to work for them.

The executives of corporations are our key public for large donations, as these are a demographic that GRID has seen success with in the past for large donations and have the resources and motivation (tax write offs, good publicity) to donate large amounts of money to nonprofits. Individual donors are our second key public because, while this demographic has more limited resources in terms of monetary donations, their contributions are still valuable and provide a great opportunity for publicity (and, therefore, increased general awareness) for GRID. Finally, solar companies willing to participate in a sponsorship program are a key target for the campaign because they would be able to provide funding to train people in GRID’s workforce program with the incentive of obtaining qualified employees for their company.

­______________________________________________________________________________

Demographics and Psychographics of Key Publics

Corporate executives are overwhelmingly male (81%), white (80.2%) and between the ages of 50 and 59. The mean income for these individuals was $100,000, and the majority live in California, Illinois and New York, in descending order. The main defining demographic in this age group in terms of media consumption is age, as those ages 50-64 watch an average of 40 hours of television a week, beating out the 35-49 age group by 10 hoursthe largest jump between any age demographic. This age group is also less likely to engage in social media, although this number is rising, particularly amongst corporate leadership30% of Fortune 500 CEOs have an active presence on at least one social network, with LinkedIn (47%) and Facebook (45%) leading as the primary social networks of choice. Most companies have a philanthropic mission, and targeting foundations that support job increase and helping those with lower income. Once a man reaches the executive status, this leads to an added philanthropic responsibility. GRID represents an increasing field with increasing profits. GRID can increase the number of employed individuals and communities, and aid in a better working economy.

Individuals most likely to donate to nonprofits are married and religious, although beyond there is little difference between the giving habits of men and women (82% and 84% self-reported donating money to charity, respectively) or after age 30 (30 to 49 year olds reported donating money to charity at a rate of 86%, 50 to 64 year olds reported 87% and 65 and up reported 88%) so this demographic is very broad. However, there are various media channels that are also very broad in scope62% of the U.S. adult population uses Facebook, unmatched by any other social media site by half. The average American also watches a median of 5 hours of live television a day, although this rate increases with age—and, statistically, with an increase in age comes an increase in wealth, which means more ability to donate money to non-profits.

        The solar industry is projected to grow a staggering 119% by the end of 2016, indicating that the need for qualified employees is growing. In fact, 11.1% of solar companies in Colorado reported that it is very difficult to find qualified employees to hire in the installation sector, 70.6% reporting that it is somewhat difficult. The age and income levels of corporate leadership in the solar industry appear to be similar to the national average and, therefore, possess similar media habits; however, 44% of those who purchased solar paneling self-reported as being “tech-savvy” and these people skew slightly younger than typical corporate leadership, which may reflect solar-specific leadership more closely despite the fact that statistics on this narrow demographic don’t exist to the public at this time.

GRID Colorado receives positive press about bringing solar power to low income areas. A majority of the news outlets are Science and Technology themed. While any press is positive, reaching a more local news outlet such as 9News and Fox 31, GRID’s coverage would be reaching target audiences. Men and women ages 30+ are consuming 36 hours of television a week. Targeting these hours and getting GRID stories in front of this age group will be beneficial.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Key Publics Self-Interests

Generation X, 35-50, is part of the generation of our target audience. According to research, this generation want to see an immediate impact of their donation, prefer to donate online, likely to give to your cause, and enjoy volunteering as well as donating. Establishing a presence in this target audience will help GRID immensely. For individuals, it will be important to appeal to these characteristics.

It is important for us to market to the needs of our key publics as to best appeal to them. With large corporations, research has found corporate giving was $17.77 billion, increasing 13.7 percent (11.9 percent when inflation-adjusted) over 2013 giving. Donating is increasing, and roughly $4 Billion is generated through the workplace. Corporations have money to give and continue to donate it. To appeal to this public, we could invite specific corporations that we are targeting to come to GRID and see where their donations are going as well as meet the people whom their donations have made an impact on. After receiving donations from this public, we will ensure a continued relationship to gain more donations as time progresses.

Smaller corporations and individuals will need to be handled differently than our large donors, in respect to their more limited funds and our need to appeal to a wider range of these entities and people. It is important to help encourage the corporations to continue donating and reach the status of large corporations.

For the sponsorship program, we will need to first inform the executive team of our targeted solar companies about the program and what its benefits are. Donors of the Generation X prefer to see the impact of their gift immediately. Installing solar energy to low-income areas is something unique and gratifying for a donor.

        As our key publics are those of large and small corporations, as well as potential individual donors, it is crucial for us to determine the ways in which each of these publics is influenced. In terms of corporation donations and sponsors, it is important to keep in mind that the number one influencer is profit, and as a result there is competition between corporations.

Large corporations have influence and power within our targeted industries. However, the priority concern for profit can affect the social good in a negative or positive way, depending on the actions ensued to reach these profits. If we can convince corporations to donate or sponsor workforce development workers, it will reflect positively on them in the public eye. When the public sees of this social good that these corporations are participating in, their profits will most likely increase and GRID produces workers and energy, which reflects in a better economy. People are drawn to companies that they view as having a positive social impact. Small corporations are influenced in the same way. With more competition amongst this market, it will be important to focus on how donating and supporting GRID will make them stand out amongst other companies to consumers.

Individual donors are different from corporations due to the fact that they already have the money and there is no concern about profit or competition. GRID provides low income houses with solar energy, and these donors have a plethora of causes that they could be donating to, so the most important factor in convincing them to support GRID will be to concentrate on the human interest aspect of the workforce development program. By communicating that GRID is targeting veterans, ex-convicts, and women, and as the people who will benefit from these donations, donors will be more inclined to support the company.

______________________________________________________________________________

Effective Media Channels

The Generation X is receiving their information on television and through the Internet. Facebook is a popular channel, and the generation spends on average 36 hours a week watching television. Television is most widely viewed amongst the demographics corresponding to our key publics of corporate donors and possible solar sponsors. Facebook is widely consumed by adult Americans of all age groups, particularly those who are younger than the prime television-viewing demographic. Because we have two very similar demographics in terms of media consumption (the corporate executives and solar company executives) that tend to be statistically older, utilizing coverage on local television stations will be crucial in reaching this public. It is also important to reach news outlets such as 9News and Fox 31 since Generation X consumes news media over the television. Because our market of individual donors is so broad, using both television and Facebook to disseminate information and reach both audiences will be most effective, as most Americans engage with both of these media on a daily basis. Traditional media channels are important too.

­­­______________________________________________________________________________

Key Messages by Public

Corporate Donors and Foundations

  1. Beat out other companies  in their philanthropic efforts and donate to the vastly expanding and gratifying world of Solar Energy.

Individual Donors

  1. Donate to the fast growing GRID Alternatives Workforce Development program and see immediate results in job turn out and solar panel installation.

Solar Companies

  1. GRID will train your new employee in the world of Solar Energy.
  2. Put your money into one of the most rapidly evolving economies, Solar Power.

­­­______________________________________________________________________________

  1. Strategies and Tactics

STRATEGY 1: Create a presence at solar energy events to develop recognition among the solar community and increase donations opportunities among potential donors and partners

 

  • Tactic: Attend and create exhibit at the Solar Power Colorado 2017 Conference (see Appendix A)
  • Tactic: Attend the monthly Colorado Renewable Energy Society (CRES) events (see Appendix B)
  • Tactic: Participate in the Colorado Energy Expo (see Appendix C)

 

STRATEGY 2: Elicit perceptions of the Workforce Development Program to be personal and motivational in nature to increase donation potential and attract program participation

 

  • Tactic: Pitch a news feature to 9 News highlighting a star employee from the program (see Appendix D)
  • Tactic: Pitch a news feature to Denver 7 about the Workforce Development Program (see Appendix E)
  • Tactic: Post testimonials on Youtube channel and GRID website from communities served by GRID (see Appendix F)
  • Tactic: Post testimonials on Youtube channel and GRID website from employees in the Workforce Development Program (see Appendix G)

 

STRATEGY 3: Create and develop a sponsorship program with companies and organizations that will fund and support a Workforce Development Program trainee

 

  • Tactic: Create and post testimonials by Workforce Development Program trainees explaining how meaningful and important the program is to them (see Appendix H)
  • Tactic: Plan a monthly summer seminar for potential sponsors to become educated on the Workforce Development Program and to meet employees/trainees of the program (see Appendices I-J)

 

STRATEGY 4: Create an ongoing relationship with charities/philanthropies/fundraising organizations dedicated to job and employment enhancement to increase donation potential

 

  • Tactic: Plan and host a solar powered concert that GRID Workforce Development Program employees/trainees will run; invite charities/philanthropies/fundraising organizations to attend the concert with the purchase of a ticket (see Appendices K-O)
  • Tactic: Host “Get to know us” events for small potential donors (see Appendices P-S)
  • Tactic: Invite potential donors, in particular, companies, to come spectate/volunteer for a day on one of GRID’s projects (see Appendices T-U)

 

STRATEGY 5: Create awareness among existing GRID donors of the Workforce Development Program so as to enhance donations for this GRID program specifically

 

  • Tactic: Create and publish a bi-monthly donor newsletter with updates on current and future GRID projects, especially regarding the Workforce Development Program (see Appendix V)
  • Tactic: Plan and host an auction for donors centered around current and future GRID projects, specifically the Workforce Development Program, so as to elicit donations (see Appendices W-X)
  • Tactic: Invite current and potential sponsors to attend and contribute to the Colorado Community Solarthon (see Appendices Y-AA)

 

STRATEGY 6: Create a Colorado-distinctive online presence to generate GRID brand awareness

 

  • Tactic: Link Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to post and share articles/graphics/videos/images daily (see Appendix AB)
  • Tactic: Post regular Youtube videos also to be linked to Facebook/Instagram/Twitter (see Appendix AC)
  • Tactic: Create a hashtag campaign for social media using #SolarMakesJobs (see Appendix AD)
  • Tactic: Create a Google Ads account to optimize searches for GRID, solar energy, jobs, employment and job training (see Appendix AE)

 

______________________________________________________________________________

CAMPAIGN MESSAGE:

Colorado goes solar and gets jobs with GRID  _____________________________________________________________________________

  1. Campaign Calendar: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1wvDgLiOBN41nZ6hMubwzsXVGidMH-053sz0Lk2Hxm7M/edit

______________________________________________________________________________6. Proposed Budget For Grid Alternatives Communications Campaign

Appendix AF

_____________________________________________________________________________

  1. Evaluation

Evaluation Techniques For Communications Campaign

Objective 1:

  • Raise $200,00 by September 2017
  • Raise additional $350,000 by September 2018
  • Raise additional $450,000 by end of 2018

These objectives can be very easily evaluated by keeping a running total of dollars raised as the campaign moves along. Anything at or above the projected numbers will be considered successes as will any number at or above the total at the end of the campaign.

Objective 2:

  • Host events as well as a sponsorship program that will help potential donors learn about GRID and the workforce development program.

This objective will be evaluated by establishing “check in” protocols at events in order to track how many people are getting the information we want them to get regarding the Workforce Development program. This can be done through “RSVP” totals as well as someone with a counter at event entrances.

Objective 3:

  • Increase awareness among key publics to GRID alternatives and the workforce development program through media outlets by 10%

This objective will be evaluated via click-throughs on articles on social media and digital media outlets as well as by using Google analytics to look into Google Adwords success. Any growth in awareness at or above ten percent will be considered a success.

_____________________________________________________________________________

  1. Appendices

Listed below are the necessary tactical materials related to this campaign plan and a brief overview of their involvement in fulfilling the campaign’s needs.

A: Presentation/Display for Solar Power Colorado 2017 Conference Exhibit

    • A physical presentation consisting of small informational and testimonial blurbs, pictures of GRID Alternatives projects in action, flyers and pamphlets to be used in GRID’s attendance and exhibition at the Solar Power Colorado 2017 Conference

B: Lanyards for GRID representatives at monthly Colorado Renewable Energy Society events

    • Colorful lanyards with GRID Alternatives’ logo and a photograph exemplifying GRID’s work to be worn by GRID representatives at all CRES events attended each month

C: Presentation/Display for Colorado Energy Expo

    • An engaging/interactive display of solar panels and/or the construction of solar panels to be used in GRID’s participation in the Colorado Energy Expo

D: News Release for 9 News Feature

    • Create an external news release about a star employee of GRID’s Workforce Development program including photographs and video footage of this employee to be sent to 9 News for a possible feature story

E: News Release for Denver 7 News Feature

    • Write an external informational news release detailing GRID’s Workforce Development Program to be sent to Denver 7 for a possible  feature story

F: Testimonial Video Footage of Communities Served

    • Video footage to be taken of GRID projects in action, individual interviews citing the importance of GRID’s work and appreciation of the community, communities using their GRID-installed solar panels, community effects of increased workforce development and after effects of GRID’s work in the community that is testimonial in nature to be posted on the Youtube channel and website

G: Testimonial Video Footage of Workforce Development Employees

    • Video footage to be taken of individuals participating the the Workforce Development program through training, installation of solar panels and other GRID-related work, job training, improvement of skills relevant to employment, employment following participation in Workforce Development Program, and interviews of employees and trainees of the program that are testimonial in nature and will be posted on the Youtube channel and website

H: Testimonial/ Motivational Video Footage of Workforce Development Employees

    • In-depth, personalized, individualized interview video footage of participants of the Workforce Development program on how important the program is/has been to them, ways it has changed their lives and encouragement of others to participate in the program

I: Presentation for Monthly Summer Seminars

    • Create a digital presentation on topic of monthly summer seminars hosted by GRID including data, statistics, quotes, photographs, videos, graphics and other visual elements that will enable the speaker(s)

J: Flyers for Monthly Summer Seminars

    • Create a physical and digital version of a flyer marketing the monthly summer seminars hosted by GRID that will be colorful and engaging and feature relevant photographs and stand-out words/phrases to attract an audience

K: Flyers for Solar Powered Concert

    • Create colorful flyers for the solar powered concert featuring pictures of the performers and an engaging photograph of solar panels at work to be distributed around target markets leading up to the show

L: Digital Flyer for Solar Powered Concert

    • Create a digital flyer for the solar powered concert that will be posted on the website, all social media and attached in email promotionals

M: Digital Invitation for Solar Powered Concert

    • Create a digital invitation to the solar concert to be sent to all donors and potential donors and sponsors

N: Ticket for Solar Powered Concert

    • Create a ticket for the solar powered concert to allow admittance and confirm purchase

O: Poster Design for Solar Powered Concert

    • Create poster/design for marketing of solar powered concert to be distributed and displayed in public target market areas, on lamp posts around Denver and in any other locations with a high potential volume of views

P: Invitation for “Get to know us” Event

    • Design and develop a physical and digital invitation to be distributed to potential donors that is eye-catching, engaging and easy to understand

Q: Reminder for “Get to know us” Event

    • Design and develop a physical and digital reminded to be distributed to those that received the invitation for the event, both that have RSVP’d and that have not that is in the same color scheme and format as the invitation

R: Pamphlet for “Get to know us” Event

    • Create a pamphlet to be handed out to guests at the event that is both comprehensive and succinct while engaging and eye-catching in its design

S: Presentation/Display for “Get to know us” Event

    • Create a presentation to be shown at the event that gives the viewers a comprehensive look at GRID, their mission and their accomplishments while expressing the need and benefit for donors and/or sponsors

T: Invitation for Spectate/Volunteer Day

    • Design and create a physical and digital invitation for potential and current donors/sponsors to come to one of GRID’s present projects to view and/or contribute to the project that is engaging, organized and easy to follow

U: Reminder for Spectate/Volunteer Day

    • Create and distribute a physical and digital reminder to be distributed to all those invited to view and/or contribute to one of GRID’s ongoing projects that is in the same color scheme and format as the invitation

V: Newsletter Layout/Design

    • Develop/create a layout/design to be used for all future bi-monthly donor newsletters that includes the GRID Alternatives logo and is eye-catching, organized and easy to follow

W: Invitation to GRID Auction

    • Design/create a physical and digital invitation to GRID’s donor auction to be sent to all past, current and potential donors and sponsors

X: Digital Reminder of GRID Auction

    • Create a digital reminder of the GRID auction to be in the same general format/ color scheme as the invitations that will be emailed to every individual/organization invited to the auction and posted on the website and all social media before the auction

Y: Invitation for Current and Potential Donors/Sponsors to Colorado Community Solarthon

    • Create an invitation to be distributed physically and digitally to current and future donors/sponsors for attendance and participation in GRID’s Colorado Community Solarthon

Z: Digital Advertisement of Colorado Community Solarthon

    • Create a digital poster marketing GRID’s flagship and fundraising event, Community Solarthon to be emailed to all current and potential donors/sponsors and posted on the website and all social media before the event

AA: Video Montage of Past Community Solarthon Events

    • Create a video montage of photographs and video footage of past GRID Community Solarthon events around the country to create excitement and anticipation that will be posted on the website and all social media, including re-posting on social media as the event date gets closer

AB: Uniform Social Media Presence Guide

    • Develop guidelines to ensure that all social media posts and presence are cohesive, engaging, linked and uniform

AC: Uniform Video Guide

    • Develop guidelines to ensure that all videos and similar media projects are cohesive and uniform in their use of GRID logos, key words and phrases, descriptions, background and foreground music, effects and editing style

AD: Hashtag Campaign Guide

    • Develop guidelines and examples for the hashtag campaign, #SolarMakesJobs, to ensure a cohesive and linked effort at establishing a Colorado-distinctive online/social media presence

AE: Google Ads Guide

    • Develop guidelines for words and phrases to be included in GRID’s Google Ads account that will ensure the optimization of searches, the relevance of GRID’s online presence and use as a Google Ad, create engagement from clicks on Google Ad, and maintain support from Google Ads

AF: Budget Included as Attachment

References

“47 Interesting Fortune 500 CEO Demographics …” Brandon Gaille. N.p., 21 Nov. 2014. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

Coleman, Abigail. “Gen X Giving – Effective Fundraising Strategies for Gen X …” Johnson Grossnickle Associates. N.p., 3 May 2016. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

“Colorado Solar Jobs Census 2015 | The Solar Foundation.” The Solar Foundation. N.p., 5 Aug. 2016. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

“DID YOU KNOW? “NEO AGE”.” Alvarez and Marsal. N.p., 10 Nov. 2014. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

Duggan, Maeve. “The Demographics of Social Media Users | Pew Research Center.” Pew Research Center. N.p., 19 Aug. 2015. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

Meyers, G. (2016, October 5). Grid Alternatives Supports Low-Income Access To Solar … Retrieved October 24, 2016, from http://planetsave.com/2016/10/05/grid-alternatives-supports-low-income-access-solar-energy/

“Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2015.” Bureau of Labor Statistics. N.p., 30 Mar. 2016. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

Shahan, Zahary. “9 Surprising Things about People Who Go Solar (Infographic …” Clean Technica. N.p., 28 Mar. 2012. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

“Statistical Overview of Women in the Workforce | Catalyst.” Catalyst. N.p., 6 Apr. 2016. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

“Statistics on U.S. Generosity | The Almanac of American …”Philanthropy Roundtable. N.p., 5 Mar. 2015. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

“The State of Traditional TV: Q2 2016 Update.” Marketing Charts. N.p., 5 Oct. 2016. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

“US Solar Market Set to Grow 119% in 2016, Installations to Reach 16 GW.” Solar Energy Industries Association. N.p., 9 Mar. 2016. Web. 24 Oct. 2016.

Rockstars & Skate Parks: The Digital Journos Finale

With the culmination of spring quarter comes the end of an era: the #digitaljournos tweets that have been keeping you updated since mid-March. From the birth of the hashtag to the mastering of Adobe Photoshop and throughout a Sarah Koenig-esque GarageBand session or two, the finale of Online and Visual Journalism has arrived simultaneous to news that rock music is becoming extinct, Detroit barely has Internet access, Zuckerberg wants to get personal and a change in the way Apple’s fingerprint privacy setting works, all from the New York Times.

Marching Music: More Memorable Than Rock’n’Roll

This week, the New York Times endeavored to quantify musical legends that have a chance at standing the test of time–and the late 1900’s love, rock’n’roll, didn’t make the cut. According to author, Chuck Klosterman, marching music, that is, the sweet sounds of Semper Fidelis, and reggae with its king, Bob Marley, are more likely to be remembered than any of the pre-millennial generation’s beloved headbangers. Apparently, this is because of the myriad of Metallica types and the ability of none to cohesively and outstandingly rise above the rest to engrain themselves into the genre. Although, like Klosterman said, “Pretty much from the moment it came into being, people who liked rock insisted it was dying.”

 

A Digitally Divided Detroit

Not unbeknownst to most of the American workforce, Detroit is a pillar of the American economy that has been crumbling since the start of the recession in 2008 with consistently high unemployment rates. Now, even more devastatingly, the New York Times has reported another reason for Detroit’s employment crisis: an overwhelmingly large gap between citizens with Internet access and citizens without. Those without access to any online technology or services are unable to search for and apply for jobs. This “digital divide” is separating those that are already unemployed even further; they can’t afford broadband access to check for e-mails from potential employers because they can barely afford food and rent. According to author, Cecilia Kang, over half the city is living in poverty, the skills gap is increasing without Internet access and any possible solutions aren’t currently viable.

 

Zuckerberg Sucking Facebook’s Privacy in the Fine Print

Another development in the world of digital journalism that arose this week was publicized by the New York Times and accuses Facebook of having a one-way mirror into its users’ private lives. Allegedly, in Facebook’s fine print, which users accept as ‘terms and conditions’ upon signing up, there is essentially a waiver that gives the social network and its advertisers access to your personal information. Although this is not news, author, Jim Rutenberg opens this discussion as a reflection on how much trust users are giving the site without really receiving anything in return. On the surface this may seem trivial, but Facebook is rapidly gaining political and international influence, making privacy and access to personal information a concern for, literally, millions.

 

Fingerprint Fivefold: Practical for Privacy?

This week’s tech tip from the New York Times informed readers that one new feature of Apple’s iPhone is an increase in the number of fingerprints that can be registered for its TouchID feature. Now up to five fingerprints from different people can be programmed for recognition in unlocking the smart phones. Fingerprints can be added, erased and named now, making phone access available to spouses, parents and other friends or family if one chooses. However, only months after the Apple vs. FBI privacy push, users of the smart products are nervous that this may be a mechanism for Apple to appease the government by underhandedly increasing possibilities for access to phones.

Since Last Time, Since Its The Last Time

Over the last few weeks, in watching how news has developed and which events are getting coverage, some observations may be worth noting. Personal privacy, especially in the digital world, is on many people’s minds and is being talked about daily. The media has started to cover Donald Trump less as America gets closer to the polls. Finally, recent comparisons of the Vietnam War and the still ongoing War on Terror have surged.

 

So, while the term may be ending, students in DU’s MFJS department’s coverage of the news will not be. Starting with my video production, Downtown Skate: The Denver Skate Park, your knowledge about one of Denver’s hidden gems and cultural pockets will kickflip your summer in the right direction. If you get even more curious, my entire Online and Visual Journalism portfolio, as well as other projects and works I’ve completed can be found on my blog: evansepaige.wordpress.com , and don’t worry I’ll be here to keep you updated all summer long. #TTYL

 

What Happens When You Zen Out

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Corepower Yoga’s studio on Colorado Boulevard is dimly lit, smells like it’s just stopped raining and has Enya-esque music playing. Designed to relax and empower, the studio relieves the stress of driving over I-25 on Colorado during 9:00AM rush hour traffic; the constant brake-go-brake-go-brake-again-go was an exercise in itself. Padding over on bare feet while tying up a long, sweaty, blond ponytail, Michelle Savage, a Corepower Yoga instructor just finished teaching a Hot Power Fusion Yoga class.

Savage is 21 years old and has completed her Masters in Professional Accounting from the University of Texas at Austin. She trained to become a yoga teacher at 19, following her freshman year as a Longhorn. A gifted student, Savage was the valedictorian of her high school class but does not attribute her stressful subject of study or the academic powerhouse, with one of the top business schools in the country, that she attended, to inspiring her to practice yoga. “My practice gives me the time to separate myself from the world, in order to get a clearer view on what really matters and what my purpose is,” says Savage, who was inspired by her mom and her first yoga teacher.

With over 140 locations worldwide, Corepower Yoga is considered the “Starbucks of yoga” by Inc.5000, and requires a more stringent teacher training program than typical studios. In addition to the required 200-hour training program all instructors must complete, Corepower Yoga requires their aspiring instructors to complement this training with an Extensions Program, taking about five weeks to complete. The program amplifies the yogic philosophy, postures, assists, adjusts and yogic history learned in the typical training program. After this, Corepower holds instructor auditions, ensuring that their newly trained teachers are ready to take on more than just the physical requirements for teaching yoga.

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Savage and Corepower’s values swear upon the importance of maintaining a desire to learn in teachers. Savage says that an imperative quality for yoga instructors is “to always be willing to be a student. There is endless knowledge out there and without willingness to be a student, knowledge is lost.” She insists that the capacity to impact students in the ways she’s been impacted hinges on her desire to learn, spice up her lessons and learn more about the practice and lifestyle of yoga. Having taught at Corepower Yoga in Austin and now in Denver, Savage aspires to embody Corepower’s promise to become the strongest and most true version of oneself after teaching at the studio.

Savage’s studio pays instructors approximately $20 per hour, despite the national average yoga instructor pay of $24.96 per hour. Corepower, however, is a yoga empire, convertingScreen Shot 2016-05-24 at 5.27.37 AM students to yogis city-by-city while defying PayScale’s assertion that most yoga studios are just barely getting by financially. Savage does not care about the money, bred by doctors, mother, a gynecologist, father, an anesthesiologist, looking simply for spiritual balance.

Abandoning her Catholic roots upon becoming a yoga instructor, Savage hasn’t been to Mass since completing her certification. Ensuring that she’s understood, Savage relays how she finds that all religions adhere to a cohesive message to love oneself and others and that she “can live that message and ideal the most when [she is] practicing and teaching yoga.”

Unlike other exercise-oriented professions, being a yoga instructor does not require higher education of kinesiology, anatomy, medicine or physical health, instead focusing on mental and spiritual balance, only able to be tapped into by a personal connection to the yogic lifestyle. Savage was mesmerized by her first Vinyasa Yoga class, remembering being “blown away” by the confidence, grace and clarity with which her teacher’s body moved.

Savage tallies her success on her students’ satisfaction. Telling of a former student that was so inspired by her classes that she pursued Corepower’s teacher training as well, Savage relates this to the inspiration she got from her first yoga instructor. Insistent upon giving almost anyone she interacts with on a personal level a savasana massage, the young instructor attributes her view on bodies as transcendent in comparison to her previously,Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 5.28.29 AM self-described, shallow assessment of body shape. She says of her mental transformation, “I truly believe that becoming a teacher facilitated my maturing from a self-conscious, perfection-driven girl, into a more loving, accepting, humble young woman.” In agreement, the crowd of men and women in Corepower’s lobby, preparing for CoreCardio Training attributed their self-love to yoga, saying they would be different people without having dove headfirst into yogic philosophy.

Yoga as a practice is dominated by women, mostly women with children, and was seen as an activity for stay-at-home moms for many years. Even Savage, who has since changed her perspective, thought yoga was lame because her mom Screen Shot 2016-05-24 at 5.29.12 AMpracticed the lifestyle. Since then she has been inspired and never looked back. Intrigued by a never-enough-knowledge mentality surrounding the limits of the human body and the way posture and body position can provoke a range of emotions, Savage feels a connection with other Corepower Yoga teachers through this fascination. Such a compulsion for the knowledge of bodily interactions with the mind and spirit inspired Savage and, upon ending the conversation, she smiled and said, “Well, what would you have done if you went to try a new workout class and found your passion?”

 

Downtown Skate: The Denver Skate Park

“we’re about good vibes and good times”

An easy ride on Denver’ s Light Rail can kickflip you right into the Denver Skate Park, one of the country’s premier skate parks, nestled on the corner of Little Raven and 19th Street. Located in the heart of the 303, the half-pipes and rails are the veins and the skaters are the blood that keepsDenver’s skate culture pumping.

The Heart & the History

Although California’s surfers decided to put wheels on their surf boards in the 1950’s, skateboarding reached its peak in the 1960’s. 1980 came and the anti-establishment movement carried over into the 1990’s, thus, skateboarding really began to grind its way into the alternative scene. After the first-ever X-Games in 1995, locals around Denver, a city that is no stranger to trends outside the mainstream, (see, Colorado’s Recreational Marijuana Lawsmodern cheeseburgers and the first and only rejection of an invitation to host the Olympics) took up plans to establish their own skate park in 1997.

“This whole skate park started in 1997 where we battled with the City Council to bring in a skate park because we were tired of being ticketed and friggin’ persecuted for our sport that we all love and enjoy.”

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A local skater practicing his “ollie” on top of one of the many ramps in the park. Photo by Anna Bernard, 2016

 

By the early 2000’s they had succeeded and the Denver Skate Park was up and running for people of all skill-sets, ages and genders.

Sometimes called “the flagship of all Colorado skate parks,” the Denver Skate Park, a prized monument by skaters around the nation, is in the heart of Downtown and overlooks Coors Field and the Denver skyline. The serenity of the view in combination with the concentrated intensity of the atmosphere culminate this park’s vibes that are conducive to the makings of enhanced surroundings and enhanced skill levels with unfaltering support from other–sometimes even unknown–fellow skate park-goers.

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After weeks of inclimate skating weather in Denver, a 303-based skateboarder got to the Denver Skate Park for an hours-long skate session. Photo by Anna Bernard, 2016

Decks with Depth & Diversity

With skaters around the Denver Skate Park representing a wide-array of ages, genders, sexualities and skate styles, this park is one of the largest and far-reaching in the nation for a reason. Those around the park go by and prefer to be referred to by their nicknames like, “Peanut,” or “Clover” that are representative of their skating style and other personality traits. Each of the skaters interviewed, ranging in age (from 7 years old to 40 years old), gender and skill-set admired the cohesive and supportive culture that the Denver Skate Park offers.

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Three young skater girls grab their boards and some snacks to take a break from practicing new tricks. Photo by Anna Bernard, 2016

“Peanut” is the daughter of an avid and long-time local skater that fought and won against the City of Denver Parks and Recreation Department for this park and said, “We get to do anything at the skate park… we can do anything. There’s no rule about boys [in one] part and girls [in the other] part.”

Easy & Eco

Only a 20-minute ride from the the University Station right across from the University of Denver, skaters and fans can easily hop on the eco-friendly light rail to the Union Station off of the E-line. Then, the park is an easy walk or roll over: about a quarter mile. A local that goes by “Quicker,” says “it’s a quick little ride down Little Raven.”  The Denver Skate Park is easy to get to and is a great option for skaters concerned about their carbon footprint.

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A lifelong skateboarder continues to practice tricks, having skated at dozens of parks before trying his tricks at the Denver Skate Park. Photo by Anna Bernard, 2016

Directions to Denver Skate Park

  1. Get your RTD pass, your deck and hop on the E-Line toward Union Station
  2. Get off at Union Station, about a 20-minute ride from the University Station
  3. Walk towards 18th Street
  4. Turn right onto Bassett Street
  5. Turn right onto 19th Street
  6. Walk/ride a couple feet and you’ve arrived at the Denver Skate Park

After observing the interactions of parents, teens, kids, twenty-somethings and more at the Denver Skate Park, the collective culture of friendliness, good times, development of skills and overall acceptance and encouragement, this public work is a hidden gem, a prized possession unbeknownst to most in the 80202.

Notes: All persons interviewed declined to provide their legal names out of reverence to skate culture, fear of persecution and privacy protection

A special thanks goes to Anna Bernard, a talented fellow Online & Visual Journalism classmate, for her help and contributions throughout the entirety of this project.

University Park’s Construction: Digging Some Holes, Filling Others

Around Denver’s University Park, construction projects are appearing on more than a few streets across DU’s campus. In documenting these construction projects, you won’t have to search long or hard. Not only are new homes and condominiums being built around campus, the University of Denver is revamping its architecture with years of building plans for the university. Less noticeable than the holes being made in the ground are the holes being filled in Denver’s unemployed population. With all these projects in one concentrated area, hundreds are needed to complete the job. After hours of filming and photographing, only a few faces were seen more than once, with dozens buzzing around one construction site.

 

 

 

 

 

The Newest in the News: Summer Flicks, Small Colleges & More

In the last three weeks news stories have been developing here in Colorado, across the nation and around the world. For those that have been avoiding their smartphones, their tablets and their laptops, Twitter’s hashtag #digitaljournos from the University of Denver’s Online & Visual Journalism students is here to keep you current.

Colleges & Their Cash Flow

The New York Times reported on small colleges and their ability, or inability, to afford the costs of keeping their doors open to students. Since the recession, small liberal arts colleges have been financially struggling, having to resort to cutting majors out of programs, firing professors and cutting programs all together.

Colorado’s Care Crisis

Recently, the New York Times explained to its audience the current debate in Colorado over health care with the mile-high state planning to institute universal coverage for all its residents. Annually, this would cost residents approximately $38 billion in taxes but would guarantee health care coverage for everyone in the state.

The NFL Draft Explained

This week, The Denver Post helped out football’s casual fans by explaining the NFL draft. By relieving the stress many part-time football fans have about which college players are really up-and-coming, how they’re picked and in what order the rounds are determined, this guide will allow anyone to keep up with even Mike Ditka this season.

UC Davis’ Chancellor Has Been Chopped

After Wednesday, UC Davis’ Chancellor Katehi has been put on administrative leave, as reported by The LA Times, sparking questions across the academic community. Katehi is now being investigated for misallocating funds, media coverups and even hiring family members improperly. Once a renowned educator, Katehi has shocked thousands in her missteps.

Spending Summer at the Movies

Much to the pleasure of digital journalists across the country, The LA Times published a list of all this summer’s flicks with trailers and digital supplements attached. With everything from Captain America: Civil War to Disney’s Finding Dory, everything you and everyone you know will want to see is covered here.

The End of the Importance of Endorsement

Recent polls and a report by USA Today has dismantled the importance of media endorsement in affecting voters’ choices in the upcoming presidential elections. Accordingly, if the amount and magnitude of media endorsements by newspapers and other news sources actually had an impact on how voters are voting, Kasich would be leading the election race.

 

Now you know. Stay tuned with #digitaljournos to find out everything you’re missing, three weeks at a time.

Making It In Music

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DJ Wasay Nabi performing at Redford’s Tavern, accompanied by brother, Nafay Nabi and friend, Lee Pryor. Photograph by Paige Evans

In one of the world’s most competitive industries, musicians are faced with devastating odds of making it while experiencing the euphoric control of performing.

“I want my music to take me all around the world,” says Carley Scott, one of Denver‘s rising local DJ’s.

The 21-year old DJ and producer, Colson Steier says, “I just kind of feel the need to do it,” in reference to making music.

After reflecting on his passion for mixing beats and sounds, DJ Wasay Nabi said, “If there’s like a party or whatever that needs like a DJ, I’ll do it.”

Not a Good Market for Musicians

In a world where 93% of musicians, artists, DJ’s and producers are selling less than 1000 albums per year, becoming successful as a performer of music is really really really difficult, to say the least. But each local artist cites a trade-off in the pursuit of success: happiness. DJ Bad Gal aka Carley Scott, DJ Wasay Nabi and DJ and Producer Colson Steier have a passion for music that runs deeper than the deep house of the 1980’s, making their annual income of $500 and free drinks at local bars totally worth it.

“When I was 9 I started playing bass guitar in a band with like three of my friends from school and then when I was 13 I just started learning every instrument I could.” says Steier. 

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DJ’s Wasay Nabi and Colson Steier, performing at Redford’s Tavern.

“I just DJ and I just do it for fun” says Nabi, who has been performing at clubs since age 15.

Scott performs under an alias and cites her muse, saying, “my inspiration is Fleetwood Mac.” Scott and her group-mates traditionally play sets that fall back on music from the 1970s – 1990s.

Likewise, Steier says, “the biggest inspiration for me probably is Pink Floyd.”

Finding Their Forte

In reminiscing on their beginnings, the community these artists were a part of was the most important.

“We would host raves in Pakistan and I would just DJ there, a lot of weekends for a couple months” says international student, Wasay Nabi.

“Me and two of my friends were really unhappy about the local music and so we decided to take it into our own hands and try out DJing,” says Scott, referring to her friends Grace Murray and Liza Scott who now perform with her regularly.

Steier, a student in the University of Denver’s Lamont School of Music is working toward and Bachelor of Music and said, “a lot of kids needed bass players so I would just get shuffled in with bands all the time and I’d be in like four different bands at a time playing bass. I produce, I’m releasing an album hopefully this summer. It’s just me and it’s all original stuff.”

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Friends and DJ’s Carley Scott, Grace Murray and Liza Scott headline at Merchant’s Mile High Saloon. Photograph by Paige Evans

No Treble in Paradise

Local musicians, like DJ Bad Gal and Colson Steier feel connected to the sounds they make and the people they make them with. The camaraderie that comes with their careers in music helps to define their passion and inspire them. However, finding your soul sister or brother is no easy feat for artists.

I like working with groups but it’s really hard to find people who work creatively well together. In high school and middle school I just didn’t really have anybody that I was that similar with, that I worked well with, but I like working in groups and I like DJing with Wasay. It’s comforting to have somebody else with you. -DJ Colson Steier

 

Wasay Nabi is an international student from Pakistan and is known by Redford’s regulars as one of Denver’s most EDC-worthy, in reference to Las Vegas’ annual Electric Daisy Carnival rave rat DJ’s and a lover house music, techno and other electronic sounds. 

Nabi says, “over here in the states I do it with Colson and at home I just do it individually, but then there’s other people as well, but they’re doing their own thing.” 

DJ Bad Gal is in a group consisting of three female DJ’s who came together, developed a set list and play at Merchant’s Mile High Saloon regularly.

“I wouldn’t be able to split up with them. We all bring a certain aspect to the group dynamic,” says Scott of her bond with her friends and co-DJ’s.

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DJ Wasay Nabi lets fan, Rosie Cook, join him in his DJ booth at a local house party. Photograph by Paige Evans

Keepin’ It Trill

Like collaborating with other artists, Denver’s local DJ’s and producers feature their audience’s happiness in every track, feeling exhilarated while in control over the crowd’s dance moves and delight.

When I’m on the stage looking out at the audience I feel like I’m in control of everyone’s happiness. – Carley Scott

 

Likewise, Steier says, “I feel like I’m in control and you just appreciate that people are there with you. It’s a weird, really cool feeling. It feels good.”

“I just feel good. It’s just a good experience to make people vibe off your music and stuff.” says Nabi, feeling proud of his sets.

While getting paid by local bars like Redford’s, Crimson and Gold and Merchant’s Mile High Saloon is nice, Colson Steier, the 21-year old with 12 years of music experience, knows he needs a back-up plan: “I don’t really necessarily expect to be successful. I don’t think it’s gonna take me anywhere really. I’m not really putting all my eggs in that basket.”

Prelude to Passion

With the po

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DJ Carley Scott loves performing and all the hard-work it entails. Photograph by Paige Evans

pularity of free streaming sites like Spotify, Soundcloud and Youtube increasing, the chance of financial stability in the world of synchronized sound is decreasing along with Apple iTunes and Amazon MP3’s downloads. Some artists will still relentlessly pursue record labels, sold-out tours and rockstar lives. 

“I’m really excited for the future and I hope everything goes up from here. For sure I would give up my other dreams to pursue music,” says Scott.

Nabi says, “it feels like an accomplishment and I feel like there’s value to what I’m doing.”

“I just do it because it’s something I really enjoy doing and I just kind of feel the need to do it. I mean deep down it’s what I’d like to do,” says Steier.

 

Now’s News: Pluto, Game of Thrones, Microhotels and More

In the realm of online, visual and digital journalism, each day brings news, change and an updates to everyday life. March 28th to April 8th was no exception. From Pluto to vertical harvesting to the release of an illustrated guide outlining all the deaths in Game of Thrones, the past three weeks have been stalked with cyber stories.

Praising Pluto

Pluto, the farthest not-planet from the Sun, has been all the rage since July 14, 2015, when NASA’s New Horizons flew by Pluto and took the closest and best images of the dwarf planet to date. Since then, as summarized and illustrated by Kenneth Change via the New York Times article, ‘What We’ve Learned About Pluto,’ more on the dwarf’s sideways moons, methane ice and ice volcanoes has surfaced, enchanting Pluto enthusiasts.

Humble Hotels

A new phenomenon in travel was written on by the New York Times on March 21, exploring the concept of “microhotels”. These miniature rooms are gaining traction and becoming increasingly popular, according to Amy Zipkin’s article. With rooms as small as 65 square feet, microhotels are being used to save money, by both customers and businesses. Companies like CitizenM and Yotel first popularized the tiny concept, hoping to capitalize on appeals to save money, curb the booming hotel market and even increase more environmentally friendly travel.

Leveling Local

On March 26, the New York Times engaged an article on how Verticle Harvest developed a way to supply local produce in Jackson, Wyoming. In a place where green and soil are frozen over for the majority of the year, finding local produce is difficult for Jacksonites. By using hydroponic methodology, this “patient capital” company grows produce in a three-story, 4,500 square foot greenhouse no matter the season. Next, Vertical Harvest has plans to open restaurants and markets inside the greenhouse, using the fresh and local produce.

Water Wealth

On March 30th, Denver, Colorado experienced a snow storm ending the mild March the usually-snowy city had. Helping to alleviate stress on water supplies, the Denver Post’s article on the benefits of the flurry, highlighted the ways the snow may save the 303’s summer. While the city’s population and Gov. Hickenlooper have been exploring ways to accommodate shrinking supplies of H2O with growing demands for an increasing populace, this storm came as a pleasant surprise. Now, the Denver area will have a relatively substantial amount of water through late July.

Monday’s Minutes

Each week, the New York Times published a compilation of short news updates. The April 4th debrief detailed the presidential election, the Panama Papers, drug wars and crime and more. With a general news section, a business section, a section on events having happened over the weekend and other notable news, the NYT Now offers a theSkimm-like production of the latest happenings to give its readers just enough to stay updated without spending myriad time consuming news.

Deadly Drawings

Last week’s April 4th, digital production by the Washington Post, brought an illustrated and interactive guide to all 704 deaths in Game of Thrones, separated by season and relevance of characters. Despite spoilers (for those who haven’t caught up), this depiction of death tells viewers the number of deaths per season (S1: 59, S2: 130, S3: 87, S4: 182 and S5: 246), how they died and the context surrounding their death. Fans of the show can now easily reflect and remember the specificities of Game of Thrones‘ twisted and complex storyline in anticipation for the season 6 premier on April 24th.

Financing Femininity

On April 6th, Glamour released a video comparing the costs of getting ready between men and women. This digitization of the cost of being a woman shows the gender bias present in production and consumption as well as in importance placed on looks. For men, getting ready costs significantly more than it does for women. Now we know, being a woman costs more while women still get paid less.

 

No matter your time allowance, your interests or your ability to stay up-to-date, #digitaljournos will have your back in tweeting the latest and greatest news, near and far (at least for the next 7 weeks).

 

 

 

Transfer Students: Changing a Fool’s Paradise to a School’s Paradise

DENVER, CO: Every year thousands of high schoolers choose between thousands of colleges and universities, banking on their intuition, hoping they’ll be happy with the higher education institution they choose. They go on tours, click around on the internet, ask their friends, counselors, parents, brothers, sisters and anyone that will listen question after question, aspiring to make their lives from ages 18 to 22 the best yet. Sorry kids, it turns out one in every three college students transfers from one college to another.

Lifestyles of the Switch and Famous

The University of Denver enrolls nearly 200 transfer students, meaning they have some secondary education credit, after receiving an average of 700 applications. Approximately 4% of DU’s Pioneer Nation is made up of students having transferred in while no data is currently available on the statistics of students leaving DU.

According to Niche, a website that ranks colleges and universities on everything from academics and looks to athletics and public transportation, DU received an overall grade of an A-, based on an average ranking of academics, athletics, campus quality, diversity, local area, professors, safety, student life and overall experiences.

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Source: https://colleges.niche.com/university-of-denver/rankings/ . Published 2016

 

The University of Denver, as voted on by students currently enrolled or Pioneer alumni,

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Hannah Gouin (left) with sister Elizabeth Gouin (right) disliked Clemson’s culture and wanted to be closer to family. Photo by Paige Evans

received its lowest grades, at C- and C+, in drug safety and campus health and safety, respectively. While the local area and party scene around the University, both earning an A+, were considered the most successful attributes DU has to offer.

Meanwhile, College Transfer reports the the top 20 reasons college students transfer:

  1. Financial Circumstances
  2. Social Circumstances
  3. Sports Transfer
  4. Military Transfer
  5. To Move Away From Home
  6. Switch Majors
  7. Restart/Return To College
  8. Desire To Be Close To Home/Family
  9. Current College Is Not A Good Fit
  10. Academic Challenge

 

Go Pios

DU boasts statistics that show 81% of Pioneers would make the same choice in choosing a college if they could do it over again. Hannah Gouin, a Hospitality Management senior, said, “I love everything about DU. I love living in Denver, I love my major and all my classes and professors and I love all the friends I’ve made here,” as compared to  Clemson University, where she transferred from after her sophomore year.

“My school was in the south. [Clemson’s] culture was one really big reason that I transferred.” -Hannah Gouin

Another University of Denver student, Jessie Burke, 21, transferred from Villanova University because she “didn’t really make any meaningful connections with people up there. I already knew people at DU, like my ex-boyfriend.” Majoring in Engineering and the founder and president of DU’s Engineers Without Borders chapter, Burke switched schools to establish better friendships that would enhance her college experience all-around.

“When I got to DU I joined Alpha Phi. Without those friendships I would never have felt empowered enough to wholeheartedly pursue a career in STEM or to start EWB. The people I met at Denver gave me the confidence I needed to excel in my male-dominated classes. Transferring here made me a better person in every sense.” -Jessie Burke

DU’s Todd Rinehart, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Director of Admission, advocates preparing high school students not for getting admitted to the university of their choice, but for achieving all that gaining higher education can offer students as world citizens.

No Pios

No statistics are made available by the University of Denver concerning students transferring out. Alia Miller, 22, transferred to DU from Gettysburg College then transferred again to the University of Connecticut. Miller said, “I just hadn’t found my fit at Gettysburg or DU. I didn’t like DU because I didn’t feel like it was a worthwhile education for me.” As a Hospitality major, Miller transferred first after her freshman year, then again after her junior year and will be graduating this spring.

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Dylan Snover commutes from Denver to Boulder every day for class. Photo by Paige Evans

Meanwhile, Dylan Snover, another senior, transferred from DU to the University of Colorado at Boulder because of his major but still lives around the DU campus. “It’s definitely not convenient, but I love my major and I love my friends at DU, so I didn’t want to have to give up one to have the other, you know?” says Snover, an Environmental Studies major.

Another DU to CU transfer student is Chad Verdi, 21, who switched schools because he “hated the way DU is run in terms of student conduct and discipline.” Verdi was suspended after his first quarter at DU and chose to transfer so as not to fall behind in school.

When choosing a college to attend, there’s no way to predict whether you’ll love it or hate it. With what seems like unlimited universities to choose from and such a high national transfer rate, students are able to explore their options and find their fit.